Monday, April 15, 2024
21.4 C
Melbourne

Eco Voice Q & A: Patricia Crifo, Professor of Economics and Director of Economics for Smart Cities and Climate Policy Master at l’X

Eco Voice
Eco Voicehttps://www.ecovoice.com.au/
First published in 2003, Eco Voice is your go-to publication for sustainability news in Australia. Eco Voice prides itself as an independent news platform with a clear focus on sustainability, with articles coming from a diverse range of contributors – all levels of government, corporations, not-for-profits, community groups, small to medium sized businesses, universities, research organisations, together with input from international sources. Eco Voice values community, conservation and commerce. Eco Voice is a media partner of the prestigious Australian Banksia Sustainability Awards – The Peak Sustainability Awards.

Patricia Crifo, Professor of Economics at Ecole Polytechnique

Stefano Dall’Aglio, Master’s student in “Economics of smart cities and climate policies” at École Polytechnique (IP Paris)

Background

Patricia Crifo is Professor of Economics at Ecole Polytechnique, member of CREST (CNRS), and associate researcher at CIRANO (Montreal, Ca). At Ecole Polytechnique, she is director of the Master Economics for smart cities and climate policy and of the Sustainable Finance and Responsible Investment IdR (TSE-Ecole Polytechnique), and deputy director of the Energy4Climate center.

Stefano Dall’Aglio is Master’s student in “Economics of smart cities and climate policies” at École Polytechnique (IP Paris).

To provide insights into Small Island Developing States in their fight for survival, Tim Langdon, publisher of Eco Voice, had the pleasure of facilitating a Q & A with Patricia Crifo, Professor of Economics and Director of Economics for Smart Cities and Climate Policy Master at l’X and Stefano Dall’Aglio.

Picture taken from Pixabay

Q1. What is your definition of Small Island Developing States?

Small Island Developing States are small insular states and territories that face particular conditions of vulnerability due to their geographical location and their territorial configuration. They are predominantly located in the Caribbean and in the Pacific Ocean.

Q2. What issues are they facing in terms of climate change?

They face the most immediate consequences of climate change (high exposure to sea level rise and an increased frequency of extreme weather events). Such exposure threatens the functioning of their economies and ultimately their survival.

Q3. Why are climate adaptation and mitigation targets and actions important in terms of their survival?

Mitigation targets can start an inversion in global emitting trends that can slow down the worsening of weather conditions. Adaptation measures can grant these states the possibility of surviving extreme weather events. It’s enough to think that for many of these islands 50% of overall state infrastructure and population is concentrated within 500 meters from the coast. In Palau (Oceania) sea level has risen 10cm since 1969, in a volcanic archipelago where most liveable land is 0n above the sea level.

Q4. How do you measure when these are working?

Climate science teaches us that global climate mitigation impacts are to be observed in the long run. Efforts won’t yield immediate impacts on the well-being of these states. However, local mitigation measures will have an immediate impact on the costs and revenues of the economies of these countries, measured in the amount of energy imports they observe as well potential exports. As for adaptation, this will be able to improve the climate resilience of these communities.

Q5. What are some of the obstacles?

The lack of visibility of these communities, whose well-being is often disregarded at the global level given the small share of global population they represent (less than 1%). The hardships observed in the mobilization of funds, and their energetic dependence on the resources provided by other states also contribute to slowing down these processes.

Q6. How can industry and governments be encouraged to assist Small Island Developing States in their fight for survival?

Contribute to funding for mitigation technologies (to grant their immediate survival), Immediately invest in industrial de-carbonation strategies to avoid a worsening of climate change over the next few decades.

Q7. How can publications, such as Eco Voice, play their part in promoting sustainability?

Give more visibility to the communities that are impacted the most by climate change. Highlight the daily struggles that climate change entails for their everyday life, their economic activity and ability to recover from extreme weather phenomena. Put the stress on projected outcomes and put pressure on policymakers to take effective action.

ABOUT ECO VOICE

First published in 2003, Eco Voice is your go-to publication for sustainability news in Australia. Eco Voice prides itself as an independent news platform with a clear focus on sustainability, with articles coming from a diverse range of contributors – all levels of government, corporations, not-for-profits, community groups, small to medium sized businesses, universities, research organisations, together with input from international sources. Eco Voice values community, conservation and commerce. Eco Voice is a media partner of the prestigious Australian Banksia Sustainability Awards – The Peak Sustainability Awards.

ABOUT ECOLE POLYTECHNIQUE

École Polytechnique, also known as L’X, is the leading French institution combining top-level research, academics, and innovation at the cutting-edge of science and technology. Its various undergraduate and graduate-level programs – Bachelor of Science, Ingénieur Polytechnicien (Master’s level program), Master’s, and PhD – are highly selective and promote a culture of excellence with a strong emphasis on science, anchored in humanist traditions. As a widely internationalized university, École polytechnique offers a variety of international programs and attracts a growing number of foreign students and researchers from around the globe (currently 41% of students and 40% of faculty members). École polytechnique offers an exceptional education to prepare bright men and women to excel in top-level key positions and lead complex and innovative projects which meet the challenges of 21st century society, all while maintaining a keen sense of their civil and social responsibilities. With its 23 laboratories, 22 of which are joint research units with the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), École polytechnique Research Center explores the frontiers of interdisciplinary knowledge to provide major contributions to science, technology, and society. École polytechnique is a founding member of Institut Polytechnique de Paris.

Plants, seeds & more delivered to your door!

www.nativeshop.com.au

Advertisement

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -
3
- Advertisement -

CONTINUE READING